Dave McGary (sculptor) (1958-2013)

Dave McGary (sculptor) (1958-2013)

Little Good Voice Elk (maquette)
bronze
20 x 0 in
Price On Request
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Standing with innocence, this young girl Little Good Voice Elk holds with great pride her doll and her fully beaded cradle board, a gift from her grandmother. The Good Voice Elk families of the Lakota Sioux people were well known for their beautiful singing voices. This part of their family history was shared with Dave during one of his many trips to the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota . Depicted here is Dave’s fourth bronze in his Native American Children Series. Little Good Voice Elk shown in her favorite traditional Elks Tooth dress made from dark blue wool, twill weave, cut from length of material folded over at the shoulders: slit cut for neck opening, tapered sleeves added. This cloth was an item obtained through trade from the white people. The style of her dress was worn for many occasions and symbolizes prestige and wealth. In observing the elk in death, it is found that two teeth remain after everything else has crumbled to dust. These teeth will last longer than life of a man, and for that reason the elk tooth has become the emblem of long life. When a child is born its parents desire long life for it, and for this reason an elk tooth is given to a child if its parents can afford the gift. The gift is expensive because of the mature elk has only two upper canines, or two milk teeth. Owning such a dress implied a father or husband who was a good hunter or who had enough wealth in horses or other belongings to trade for teeth. Her dress has a long belt with silver disk known as Conchos ; they were manufactured by white people for trade with Indians and were popular among many tribes during the later part of the nineteenth century. Her leggings have a traditional butterfly design; early Native American legends reveal stories of butterflies carrying various wishes to the Great Spirit. This design is still used today and can be seen in many different ceremonies in the northern plains region. Her long braids are embellished on one side with an eagle and red tail hawk feather attached by a medicine wheel with quill work and pony beads. Most tribes carried babies on cradle boards. These “vertical cradles” allowed children to view the world from the same perspective as their parents. Native Americans have deep respectful relationships with children. Girls assist in the care of younger siblings and relatives. Dolls and miniature baby carriers were treasured by Plains youngsters.


About The Artist

Dave McGary (sculptor) (1958-2013)

"Amazing," "astounding," and "unbelievable detail," are some of the most frequent first words heard when people view renown artist Dave McGary's bronze sculptures of Native Americans.  The works are masterpieces of anatomical and historic accuracy.  They are also based upon real persons of American history.  They are collected by individuals, corporations and institutions on a worldwide basis.  
 
Dave McGary was raised on a cattle ranch in Wyoming.  His art career began early in life.  At 12, he sculpted in clay.  At 16, he received a scholarship to spend a year in Italy studying the human form and the art of bronze casting.  Shortly after his return to the U.S., Dave began working at a Santa Fe foundry, and began a friendship with a Sioux artist that contributed significantly to Dave's interest in sculpting the American Indian.  Subsequently, Dave was adopted into the Ogala Sioux tribe and given the name Wambalee Tanka, "Big Eagle." But his adopted family on the reservation are more likely to refer to him as "Big Red Ears" because of his predilection for soaking up tales of their ancestors.  A McGary bronze is a unique combination of pure American West and classic Renaissance art form of Italy.  
 
Each work contains many elements of historical authenticity, emotion, artistic skill and bronze casting technology. This special combination has been recognized through the placement of works at a wide variety of governmental and corporate locations.  Each year, Dave receives numerous requests to execute commissions -- most of which he must turn down due to his schedule and family life (he, his wife Molly and their child divide time between homes in New Mexico and Arizona).  
 
Among the permanent public installations is one that may be seen in Santa Fe's Grant Park.  The 14-foot-high work depicts Don Pedro de Peralta and his surveyor as they lay out early Santa Fe. The artist has also been exhibited in a One-man Show at the Russell Senate Rotunda in Washington D.C.   
 
Meyer Gallery is pleased to display the magnificent bronzes of renown sculptor Dave McGary.

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